June 11 – Nome Moose Report

Although my recent (May 29-June 5) trip to Nome was to see birds, some of the most memorable parts of the trip were the moose sightings. If you have been to Alaska, you probably are aware that it is common to see moose, sometimes only dimly, yet most Alaskans just want to see moose even more. than they do.

At this time of the year, however, it is the babies that make moose sightings special. Toward the end of the Nome trip, we were able to see a mother and newborn across the river from us. Even at that distance, the mother appeared ready to charge if we made a move in her direction.

The most memorable moose sighting of the trip came earlier, however. I was driving along Kougarok Road, which runs along a wide river (the Nome River, as I recall). Way off to my left I noticed a moose in the brush. Oddly, she seemed to be slowly turning in circles. Was she tethered or somehow caught in the brush? I stopped to watch, and then realized that mostly hidden beneath her was a youngster.

For some reason, the mother decided it was time to head across the river, aiming apparently for a spot in front of me.  I watched them cross the first section of the river, which seemed to go okay. And so did a second section of the river.

But then they came to the main part of the river, clearly much deeper, and the youngster could not quite make it and they turned back. The mother was so intent on this journey, so I was sure they were going to try again, but it was so scary I could not watch anymore.

So I don’t know the end of the story. Go ahead and write a happy ending for yourself, which I hope there was. When I returned later on my way to Nome itself, I did not have any moose sightings.

Note: my computer was not happy today to work with my blog host, and I had much difficulty making progress for a long time. Therefore, I’m not sure what will actually show once I publish this post. Let me know if much seems to be missing or garbled.

Also, I do plan to publish some photos of birds and scenes soon from this Nome trip, assuming I can get my blog stuff to work.

 

April 12 – Spain Highlights Part II

The second half of our trip to Spain was spent in Andalucia in southernmost Spain. Much of the trip was near and around the off-limits central portion of Donana National Park. This area is much flatter and lower than the Extremadura portion of our trip, with many wetlands with a wide variety of waterfowl and other water-loving birds.

A major highlight of this portion of the trip was the flamingos. A small selection of my flamingo photos follows.

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Other long-legged wading birds included Black-winged Stilts, Eurasian Spoonbills, Pied Avocets, Glossy Ibises, Black-crowned Night-Herons and a Squacco Heron. Not shown are photos of the Gray and Purple Herons.

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Ducks seen include Common Pochard, Crested Pochard, Northern Shovelers, Garganey, Ferruginous Ducks, White-headed Ducks, and Common Shelducks.

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Also seen were Great Crested Grebes, Eurasian Coots and Red-knobbed Coots, and Purple Swamphens.

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While we saw Hoopoes many days and heard them even more often, only rarely did they allow more than a rapid, fly-by view.

On three different days a bit farther away from the water we saw Little Owls, and on one day got to see two Barn Owls in a next box.

Some of the best sightings, however, were the members of our birding group. A selection of photos of some of them follows taken in both portions of the trip.

I also took many photos of scenes, plus more bird pictures of course, and will try for one more post about the trip.

 

December 14 – Nome & Anchorage in early December

I spent Dec. 4-7 in Nome, where, as I expected, there were few bird species around. Unexpectedly, however, the Nome harbor area was full of gulls. This is apparently very unusual, and every time I tried to post my sightings on eBird, I was asked the same thing: was I really sure that I had seen this many gulls? The video below shows one pan of just one of the gull flocks, so you can get an idea of what fun it was to try to count them.

Gull species were mostly Glaucous, but there were also multiple Glaucous-winged and Herring, a Thayer’s or two and two Slaty-backed Gulls. Below are some pictures of scenery and birds (gull, Gyrfalcon (2 different birds, at least) and buntings, mostly McKay’s Buntings and a couple of Snow Buntings) taken during that trip.

My kind hosts, Remi & Igor, shared their home and wonderful meals with me.

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Since I have been home, it has finally become winter, evidenced by yesterday’s 5-6 inches of snow and another inch or two since then. We now are a 2-snow-thrower family, the “his” version being shown below.

May 12 (Part 3): Lakes Spenard and Hood

As is often the case in summer, highlights at these two lakes were loons. There was a Common Loon floating along and preening.

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I saw a Red-throated Loon fly in on the north side of the lakes while I was on the south side. It was at one of its two “favorite” sites, along Floatplane Drive, when I got around to the north side. As last year, it was very tame. After I watched for a short period, it lowered its head and began to make its lonesome calls.

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Raptors seen were a Bald Eagle and an Osprey (the latter photographed nearly over my head through the car windshield).

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There were also at least two Red-necked Phalaropes bobbing in the bumpy waters on Lake Hood.

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The yellowlegs there seemed to be only Lesser, as far as I could tell.

A single Spotted Sandpiper called from near one of the planes.

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I also saw distant ducks (Greater Scaup and Barrow’s Goldeneyes) and photographed Northern Shovelers that were somewhat closer.

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Tomorrow I have a few other things to do than bird, so I’ll need to refrain from birding all the time.

 

 

August 22 – Rain, Rain and Birds

There have been mostly rainy days lately. Most of my birding has been in my backyard, where the usual juncos and siskins have predominated. I was able to see a first-for-our-yard Savannah Sparrow briefly in the area of our lawn that I am allowing to go wild, but it disappeared soon after.

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The snow is gone from the nearby mountaintops where it made it look like winter was here, and today it actually got to near 70 degrees at our house. Maybe we will have more non-winter days for awhile.

On August 18th I went to Spenard Crossing to see if there were any interesting woodland birds around. A highlight was two Northern Waterthrushes.

I also photographed a distant Belted Kingfisher and a Glaucous-winged Gull eating a dead salmon.

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Today I went to the Potter Marsh boardwalk. The water was very high, probably due both to the recent rains and it being near high tide. Although at first it looked like the sun would appear, for most of the time I was there the clouds were coming in.

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Both the Wilson’s Snipe and the Greater Yellowlegs were having difficulty finding a place to stand in the deep water, but it was fine for the ducks, the Belted Kingfisher on a snag and the Yellow-rumped Warblers in the brush along the boardwalk.

 

 

 

August 14 – South and North Anchorage and Home

I’ve not birded as much as usual lately due to rain and manuscript rewriting and other commitments. On Saturday (8/12) I did spend some time at Potter Marsh, where Great Yellowlegs were the predominant bird. There were also a number of Wilson’s Snipe flying around and sitting down next to the water every now and then.

 

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Although they were not doing anything spectacular, I took a video of a few Green-winged Teal that were dabbling in the water.

Today I drove up Arctic Valley Road. Although it started out quite cloudy, by the time I got to the top there was some blue sky.

For the first couple of miles the number of bears equaled the number of birds (2 each), but eventually there was a small number of each of 17 species. Highlights along the road were a Varied Thrush hidden in a berry bush and a small flock of Gray Jays.

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I walked up the trail at the end of the road for a while. There were about ten berry pickers up there. I munched a few blueberries too and got pictures of a Fox Sparrow, a Wilson’s Warbler, and a White-crowned Sparrow before heading back to my car.

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I also spent some time photographing flowers and other vegetation along the path.

At home the Pine Siskins are becoming more numerous, with over 20 around much of the time now, eating at my numerous feeding areas. There are up to 10 Dark-eyed Juncos eating feed too, and of course always Steller’s Jays. Most of the jays are either scruffy-looking juveniles or scruffy-looking molting adults. At least three of the jays are becoming quite accustomed to eating out of my hand but they prefer to get peanuts out of the jar that we have fastened to the porch (note: all that stuff in the background of the jay video is in our neighbors’ yard, not ours).

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The highlight this afternoon was Sandhill Cranes calling as they flew high over our house. I believe that I hadn’t had any for our Anchorage yard list before these.

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July 12 – In Nome

Yve Morrell and I are in Nome trying to get her some new birds for her big year and trying to get a Pied Wheatear for both of us,  a seriously rare bird that neither of us has so far been able to see. But we keep trying. It has been great fun and good weather and great birds so far though. Best bird of the day – Bar-tailed Godwit.image.jpg

June 3 – More Wandering Around Anchorage

Yesterday I birded with Carolyn Noble and Susan Roy before their scheduled birding trip to Nome. We visited some of my favorite spots, including Hood Lake, where the well-known and often-photographed Red-throated Loon came within a couple of feet of me. It is a very odd experience to be standing on shore and look down at a loon and then be splashed when the loon dives.

We also went to an area along the lake where there were five Spotted Sandpipers all displaying and calling (not all are shown in the picture), while a Savannah Sparrow steadfastly kept up his song.

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We also went to Westchester Lagoon and the nearby coastal trail, where there were five Sandhill Cranes very near the trail.

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Today I drove up Arctic Valley Road nearly becoming part of the Arctic Valley Run that I had not known was going to be there. There were five arctic hares spaced out along the road, a couple of which stayed on the road as I drove by.

I also was able to get my first-of-the-year photo of a distant Townsend’s Warbler and another of a perched up Fox Sparrow.

I did have time before the run was to occur to walk along the trail at the top of the road, where a few flowers were in bloom.

Back at Hood Lake, which is becoming nearly a daily destination for me, there were at least four Red-necked Phalaropes, one of which tamely swam right next to me on the shore and another one of which seemed to be keeping company with a Least Sandpiper.

I really enjoy just going out and birding wherever sounds like an interesting place to bird without worrying (very much) about whether any “new” birds will be around.

June 2 – South of Anchorage

Yesterday, a gorgeous sunny day, I drove south of Anchorage to Girdwood and ultimately walked for a while along the Trail of Blue Ice that goes out of the Moose Flats Day Use Area on the Portage Highway. The photos (yes, they all are right-side-up) show scenes along the way including two Trumpeter Swans at the foot of an avalanche from last winter.

At the Girdwood gas station, a Northwestern Crow was sunning itself on the roof.

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In the marshy area just south of Girdwood I pulled over to see what was around and immediately heard a Red-winged Blackbird. It appears to be a young male, and I may also have seen a female dart into the grasses.

There were also Cliff Swallows dipping down to the water and flying low around me.

On the Trail of Blue Ice, warblers were singing everywhere – Northern Waterthrush (photo) and Yellow-rumped, Orange-crowned, Wilson’s and Yellow Warblers as were both Varied, Hermit and Swainson’s Thrushes. There also was a Rusty Blackbird off in the marsh.

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On the way back I found a couple of singing Song Sparrows along the highway between the Portage Highway and Girdwood.

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I drove over to Alyeska and walked the trail (Winner trail?) for a while. There I found the usual Pine Siskins and White-winged Crossbills, and both of my goal birds, Townsend’s Warblers and Golden-crowned Kinglets (photos).

Back in Anchorage I checked out Hood Lake and found that the Red-throated Loon was more cooperative than it had been recently. The Red-necked Phalaropes were also still there hidden in the vegetation at the edge of the water, and of course Red-necked Grebes were around.

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Today I go birding in the Anchorage area with two birders from California.